Mental Health

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Depression

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Overview

Everyone occasionally feels blue or sad, but these feelings are usually fleeting and pass within a couple of days. When a person has a depressive disorder, it interferes with daily life, normal functioning, and causes pain for both the person with the disorder and those who care about him or her. Depression is a common but serious illness, and most who experience it need treatment to get better.  The good news is that Depression, even the most severe cases, is a highly treatable disorder. For more information visit My healtheVet, Depression.

Screening
You may be wondering if you have symptoms of Depression. One way of determining that is to take a brief confidential and anonymous screen. Only you will see the results of the brief screen. None of the results are stored or sent anywhere. You can choose to print a copy of the results for your own records or to give to your physician or a mental health professional.

VA Programs & Services

A number of depression treatments are available. Medication and psychological counseling (psychotherapy) are very effective for most people. There are also many types of professionals who treat depression. A good place to start is with your primary care physician. In some cases, a primary care physician can prescribe medication to relieve depression symptoms. However, if treatment by your physician does not help you, the next step is to see a mental health professional.

  • Health professionals who can diagnose depression and prescribe medicine include: Family Physicians, Internists, Psychiatrists, Physician Assistants, Nurse Practitioners, and Obstetricians or Gynecologists.
  • Treatment such as professional counseling or therapy can be provided by: Psychiatrists (who can also prescribe medicine) or Psychologists.
  • Other health professionals who also may be trained in treating depression include: Social Workers, Licensed Professional Counselors, and Psychiatric Nurses.
  • The VA provides two evidence based treatments for depression: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT).
    • CBT is an effective psychotherapy based on decades of research that has shown the strong relationship between thoughts, emotions and behaviors, and how these lead to depression. CBT helps patients learn new patterns of thinking and to develop new positive behaviors.
    • ACT, also supported by clinical research, is also based on the relationship between thoughts, feelings and behaviors. ACT helps patients overcome their struggle with emotional pain and worry and take active steps to move forward and achieve what matters most to them.
  • MakeTheConnection.net: Visit this site to view hundreds of stories from Veterans of all service eras who have overcome mental health challenges. MakeTheConnection.net is a one-stop resource where Veterans and their families and friends can privately explore information on mental health issues, hear fellow Veterans and their families share their stories of resilience, and easily find and access the support and resources they need.
    • Watch video testimonials from Veterans who have found ways to manage depression, and to learn more about depression, its symptoms, and treatment.

    MTC

Articles & Fact Sheets

Fact Sheets

Articles

  • Late Life Depression: According to the VA’s National Registry for Depression, 11% of Veterans aged 65 years and older have a diagnosis of major depressive disorder, a rate more than twice that found in the general population of adults aged 65 and older.
  • Seasonal Affective Disorder: Seasonal Affective Disorder, also known as “winter depression,” is not pure seasonal depression, but seasonal worsening of pre-existing depression. It is defined as “recurring depression with seasonal onset and remission,” mostly affecting people who already have depression.

Other Resources

  • National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) – Depression: A grassroots organization dedicated to improving the lives of individuals and families affected by mental illness. Provides information on symptoms, causes, diagnosis, treatment and more.
  • National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) - Depression: A national organization whose mission is to transform the understanding and treatment of mental illnesses through basic and clinical research, paving the way for prevention, recovery and cure. Provides information on signs, symptoms, treatment, clinical trials and more.
  • Mental Health America (MHA) - Depression: A nonprofit dedicated to helping all people live mentally healthier lives. Provides a number of factsheets on depression such as: Depression: What You Need to Know and Signs of Depression Checklist.
  • Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA) – Depression: A national organization focusing on the most prevalent mental illnesses. Provides information on symptoms and types of depression, as well as a few brochures such as: Myths and Facts about Depression and Bipolar Disorder.
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